January 11, 2013

Dialoging about Diabetes: PWDs Offer Ways to Improve Communication and Care #6 Ginger Vieira

Dialoging about Diabetes As a diabetes educator/healthcare provider (DHCP) I’m observing that the rapidly growing world of the Diabetes Online Community, the DOC for short, is helping people with diabetes (PWD) and their loved ones find support and feel supported. People are connecting, building relationships and feeling more positive about the challenges of managing their diabetes. I’m delighted to see this trend!

As a DHCP I’ve long realized that I can’t walk a mile in a PWD shoes. I can’t know what it is like day in, day out to deal with this challenging and relentless disease. But, what I do know is that we can learn from each other to change the dialog between providers and PWD to be more positive, more supportive.

Goal one with Dialoging about Diabetes interviews with diabetes activists is to help make living with diabetes…just a bit easier. Goal two is to enhance the two-way street – to help more PWD get connected and encourage more DHCPs to open the doors of social networking to PWD.

 
January 2, 2013

Rather than New Year’s Resolutions Make Lasting Healthy Lifestyle Changes

No NY resolutionsWith all the chatter about New Year’s Resolutions which for the most part fail to result in REAL CHANGE for most people, why not try a different approach in 2013? Consider these 5 key principles to a healthier lifestyle I recently offered at an American Association of University Women meeting after a showing of Food, Inc.

About Food Inc. I absolutely agree that our food supply and eating habits have gone thru an unfortunate evolution in the last 30 plus years. I also agree we have to slowly and steadily do the hard work to reset our food environment to 'make the healthier choice the easier choice.' Today, it certainly isn’t!  While I’m totally supportive of people eating organically grown foods, locally grown foods, growing their own foods and am supportive of many sustainable agriculture initiatives around the globe, I’m a pragmatist and realist at heart. I believe that for the majority of Americans we’ve got to keep in our mind’s eye the reality of our current eating habits. With these realities in mind we need to set realistic goals for ourselves, our population.

 
November 29, 2012

Book Review: Behavioral Approaches to Treating Obesity: Helping Your Patients Make Changes That Last

This is one in a series of book reviews. You may find these books beneficial if you: manage prediabetes or diabetes, follow a diabetes meal plan and/or try to eat healthy to live well. These book reviews also appear on amazon.com and the books can be found in my amazon a-store.  Please check them out and consider a purchase. 

Note: This book is geared to healthcare providers who help people make behavior changes. I’ve recently reviewed a similar book for healthcare providers Inspiring and Supporting Behavior Change: A Food and Nutrition Professional’s Counseling Guide

Behavior Change_ArnoldNo longer is it unusual to hear the term ‘obesity’ in our culture. While studies and books abound on the topic, Behavioral Approaches to Treating Obesity, Helping Your Patients Make Changes That Last, by experts Brigitta Adolfsson, PhD and Marilynn S. Arnold, MS, RD, have created an all-in-one resource and reference guide for healthcare providers (HCPs). 

Behavioral Approaches to Treating Obesity begins with an in depth overview of the dismal statistics about obesity in America. The authors proceed to cover the multi-factorial nature of weight gain. They also discuss the possible ‘solutions’ for obesity which include bariatric surgery, obesity medications and/or healthy lifestyle changes. 

Adolfsson and Arnold invite HCPs to view obesity from a different perspective…being open to every and all treatment modalities. In utilizing behavior change techniques for healthy lifestyle changes people make the decisions while the HCP interacts in a manner that supports the person’s well-being. 

 
November 29, 2012

Book Review: Inspiring and Supporting Behavior Change: A Food and Nutrition Professional’s Counseling Guide

This is one in a series of book reviews. You may find these books beneficial if you: manage prediabetes or diabetes, follow a diabetes meal plan and/or try to eat healthy to live well. These book reviews also appear on amazon.com and the books can be found in my amazon a-store. Please check them out and consider a purchase. 

Note: This book is geared to healthcare providers who help people make behavior changes. I’ve recently reviewed a similar book for healthcare providers Behavioral Approaches to Treating Obesity: Helping Your Patients Make Changes That Last

Changing behaviors is a difficult process, period! When it comes to changing behaviors to impact health outcomes, frustrations can multiply for the person managing the condition and the healthcare providers (HCPs) encouraging the person to make changes.

Inspiring and Supporting Behavior Change: A Food and Nutrition Professional’s Counseling Guide, written by Ann Constance and Cecilia Sauter, both dietitians and Certified Diabetes Educators with years of expertise counseling people with diabetes, is a handbook designed to help HCPs learn to more successfully and effectively inspire people to make critically important behavior changes. 

 
November 20, 2012

Insulin Resistance, Weight Gain and Type 2 Diabetes: Connect the Dots

apple vs. pear shape

Have you heard the terms insulin resistance, insulin sensitivity and metabolic syndrome in the same breath as prediabetes and type 2 diabetes? Do you wonder how these terms are intertwined with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes?

Learn the terms and gather action steps put them in reverse or at least slow their progression over time.  

What Is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin resistance most often occurs in people who are overweight. People who carry their extra weight around their middle – the abdomen or waist line - are at increased risk. The medical term for that apple shape is central adiposity. 

 
November 16, 2012

Out Raising Awareness During American Diabetes Month

The diabetes stats are downright staggering! Nearly 19 million people are diagnosed with diabetes in the U.S. and another 6 million are estimated to have diabetes but don’t yet know it. Add to this number, another 79 million people with prediabetes yet barely 10 percent of these throngs of people know they have it. 

Unfortunately people continue to think of type 2 diabetes as a ho-hum disease and tend not treat it early and aggressively. Yet we know early and aggressive care of type 2 is exactly what keeps people healthier longer. And we know early awareness and action with prediabetes can prevent/delay the progression to type 2 diabetes.

So, to honor American Diabetes Month, I’ve grabbed every opportunity which has come my way to raise awareness, educate and promote action. Check out links to these guest blogs, videos, and interviews:

 
November 7, 2012

Got Diabetes? Necessary or Needless to Follow 'A Diabetic Diet'?

Is there ‘a diabetic diet’? NO!

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), and this has been true since 1994 – nearly 20 years, there is no one diabetic diet that represents THE prescription for THE way ALL people with diabetes should eat.  

Are there ‘diabetic foods’ which people with diabetes should buy? NO!

Foods labeled ‘diabetic’ or ‘diabetic-friendly’ carry a halo of being better-for-you than unprocessed, unadulterated and unlabeled foods. But, it’s just not so. 

So, then what’s the eating plan for people with diabetes today?

The nutrition recommendations from the American Diabetes Association, last updated in 2008, echo the healthy eating recommendations of the United States Dietary Guidelines for Americans last revised in 2010.

These recommendations reflect the growing body of evidence that a plant-based eating plan can help people achieve and maintain a healthy body weight and prevent and manage chronic diseases, like diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers.

 
October 24, 2012

Let’s Look Ahead From Look AHEAD

Have you heard that the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) randomized controlled trial conducted through National Institutes of Health (NIH) was ended two years ahead of schedule? This news crossed my eyes first on 10/20/2012 via twitter. Got to love twitter!

The press information from the NIH’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), announced on 10/19/2012 that the trial had been stopped about a month earlier – in September. Why? Because in this long and lengthy trial, in which people had been enrolled for up to 11 years, the people in the intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) group did not experience a decrease in cardiovascular events (CV) (heart attacks, strokes, etc.) compared with the people in the control group. 

The Key Look AHEAD Question…and Answer
Can an intensive lifestyle intervention program (ILI) which achieves and maintains weight loss help prevent/delay the heart and circulatory problems which are the most common complications of type 2? 

 
October 1, 2012

Dialoging about Diabetes: PWDs Offer Ways to Improve Communication and Care #5 Leighann Calentine (aka The D-Mom)

As a diabetes educator/healthcare provider (DHCP) I’m observing that the rapidly growing world of the Diabetes Online Community, (the DOC) is helping people with diabetes (PWD) and their loved ones find support, feel supported. People are connecting, building relationships and feeling more positive about the challenges of managing their diabetes. I’m delighted to see this trend!

As a DHCP I’ve long realized that I can’t walk a mile in a PWD shoes (or in the case of this interviewee the shoes of a parent of a child with diabetes). I can’t know what it is like day in, day out to deal with this challenging and relentless disease. But, what I do know is that we can learn from each other to change the dialog between providers and PWD to be more positive, more supportive. In these Dialoging about Diabetes blogs I interview diabetes activists and social networkers with the goal of gathering ways DHCPs can change our practices to better support the diabetes care efforts of PWD and make living real life…just a bit easier.

 
September 6, 2012

Book Review: The PCOS Workbook: Your Guide to Complete Physical and Emotional Health

This is one in a series of book reviews. You may find these books beneficial if you: manage prediabetes or diabetes (or for this book Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome), follow a diabetes meal plan and/or try to eat healthy to live well. This book review and others also appear on amazon.com. The books I’ve reviewed here can be found in my amazon a-store. Please check them out and consider a purchase.

PCOS WorkbookHave you been diagnosed with Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)? Are you experiencing trouble getting pregnant? Or have you begun to link your symptoms of weight gain, irregular menstrual cycles, acne, and hair where you don’t want it and not where you do want it to what just might be PCOS?

If so, do you long  for a book to help you learn the ins and outs about PCOS and how to manage it? Well, you’re in luck! Angela Grassi, MS, RD and Stephanie Mattei, Psy.D, who both apply their crafts (nutrition counseling and psychology, respectively) with women with PCOS, have created a valuable guide for this multifaceted disease, The PCOS Workbook.

 
 
 
Hope Warshaw